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Porous Knowledge

Cheri Smith
This is a research blog which informs my art and writing practice.
transoptic:

“The purkinje vein figure,” Fritz Kahn, Das Leben des Menschen 5 (1931), 61. Artist: Alwin Freund-Beliani.

transoptic:

“The purkinje vein figure,” Fritz Kahn, Das Leben des Menschen 5 (1931), 61. Artist: Alwin Freund-Beliani.

(via scientificillustration)

angeladalinger:

Nightswimming  / from 2011

angeladalinger:

Nightswimming  / from 2011

(via inspirali)

Matisse, The Fall of Icarus (1947)

Matisse, The Fall of Icarus (1947)

A giant squid found in Logy Bay, Newfoundland, in 1873

A giant squid found in Logy Bay, Newfoundland, in 1873

Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka
Portuguese man o’war, Physalia Pelagica model

Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka

Portuguese man o’war, Physalia Pelagica model

benedicthemmens:

Close up of blue chipboard fence near my house.

benedicthemmens:

Close up of blue chipboard fence near my house.

life update: I have begun painting and keeping a wordpress blog of writing and reviews. I work at the Natural History Museum and go to London lots and I think I’d like to live there. I’ve been reading short stories by Kelly Link and listening to St Vincent and KATE BUSH IS TOURING. 
I don’t know how to make this blog my main one??

life update: I have begun painting and keeping a wordpress blog of writing and reviews. I work at the Natural History Museum and go to London lots and I think I’d like to live there. I’ve been reading short stories by Kelly Link and listening to St Vincent and KATE BUSH IS TOURING. 

I don’t know how to make this blog my main one??

An early 18th-century German Schrank with a traditional display of corals (Naturkundenmuseum Berlin)

An early 18th-century German Schrank with a traditional display of corals (Naturkundenmuseum Berlin)

rhamphotheca:

Why You Should Care That Sea Cucumbers Are Going Extinct

by Jason G. Goldman

Sea cucumbers are in trouble. Everyone knows about the problems that elephants and rhinos face due to poaching, that dolphins face due to drive hunts, and that sharks face when overzealous governments try to convince their constituents that they’re helping them avoid shark attacks. Sea cucumbers may not be as charismatic as their megafaunal counterparts, but they actually provide an important service for reef ecosystems.

They help to keep the sand in reef lagoons and seagrass beds fresh by turning them over, and by feeding on the dead organic matter that’s mixed in with the sand, the nutrients they excrete can re-enter the biological web by algae and coral. Without the sea cucumbers, that sort of nutrient recycling could not occur. It’s also thought that sea cucumbers help to protect reefs from damage due to ocean acidification. Feeding on reef sand appears to increase the alkalinity of the surrounding seawater.

The problem, according to a study conducted by Steven Purcell and Beth Polidoro, is that sea cucumbers are considered a luxury snack. As they explain at The Conversation, dried-out versions of the tropical species retail between $10 and $600 per kilogram in Hong Kong and on mainland China. There’s actually one species that is sold for $3000 per kilo, dried. Sea cucumbers are thought of as “culinary delicacies,” and often adorn the buffets of festival meals and are served at formal dinners…

(read more: animals.io9)

I really like this picture in particular because the snakes look like coral, and the myth of Medusa has all these links to coral and how coral was thought to have been formed in ancient greece, it’s all just lovely

I really like this picture in particular because the snakes look like coral, and the myth of Medusa has all these links to coral and how coral was thought to have been formed in ancient greece, it’s all just lovely